The Essential Guide to Archery Equipment For Beginners

If you’re thinking of taking up archery, it’s vital you have the right equipment. If you don’t have good quality equipment before you start, you might struggle to grasp certain fundamentals.

Here’s our guide to the archery equipment every beginner needs to hit the ground running with their training.

Bow

Ensuring you have the right bow is the most obvious – and essential – place to start.

When it comes to finding the right bow as a beginner, there’s no right or wrong approach. You just need to find the one that you feel suits you best.

The best thing to do is to go to a store that sells archery equipment (if you Google ‘archery equipment store near me’ you should get loads of relevant results) and try as many bows as you can. Try and get a feel for them and see which one makes you feel comfortable. Ideally, the bow should be within two inches of your height and it’s okay if your bow is taller than you.

If you’re looking for a bow that’s easy to set up so you can start shooting immediately, then a recurve bow is the best option. This recurve bow from Samick Archery would be a great choice for beginners and is available at a reasonable price.

Arrows

Arrows can be quite difficult to buy when you’re a beginner. You need to know your draw length in order to buy the right arrows, so it’s vital that you visit a store. There, you’ll be able to get your wingspan measured and use this measurement to calculate your draw length.

As a beginner, you don’t want to spend loads of time building your own arrows, so don’t be afraid to spend a little money for some pre-built arrows. It’ll pay off in the long run.

Gloves

Using a glove is a good idea when you start out. Not only can a glove help to protect your hand, but it can also aid you with your release. It’s also one of the better options if you decide to start with a recurve bow (there are more details of other options below).

Gloves also add a level of comfort and they can last a long time. This Bearpaw summer glove is a great place to start and it isn’t too expensive.

Finger Tabs

If you’re not a fan of the idea of wearing a glove, then using a finger tab is a great alternative. The tab covers the palm on your draw hand and is a good choice for people who find wearing a glove too constrictive.

Much like gloves, finger tabs are easy to find online and don’t cost too much money. This platform tab from A&F is a good choice for beginners and it’s available in a range of sizes.

Quivers

Naturally, as an archer, you’ll need something to help you carry your arrows. This is where a back or hip quiver comes in handy.

Whether you choose a hip or back quiver depends on what you’re most comfortable with. A hip quiver will keep your arrows facing out in front of you so you can grab them from your side. Back quivers, on the other hand, keep your arrows behind your head, so you’ll have to reach behind you to grab your next arrow.

Whichever option you choose, there are plenty of stylish options out there. This Easton hip quiver is available in a range of different colours and is made of a woven fabric that makes it very comfortable. If you’d prefer a back quiver, though, then this more traditional quiver from Neet is a great option and is made of high-quality leather.

Specialist archery insurance from Gunplan

Once you have all the equipment you need, it’s important that you get the right insurance. Without it, you could end up having to pay out if you damage your new equipment or if you damage equipment that belongs to a fellow archer.

With our specialist archery insurance, you can ensure that you are fully protected whenever you  get into the swing of things with your new hobby. Get an instant online quote with us today.

Related

The Do’s And Don’ts Of Archery Training

The 7 Most Common Archery Injuries And How To Prevent Them

Top Tips For Getting Into Archery

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